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Timbuk? Anyone ever hear of it.

Discussion in 'Dealer's Choice Games' started by hachkc, Apr 27, 2005.

  1. hachkc

    hachkc Well-Known Member

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    I used to play a split pot game about 10 years ago that always seemed to generate a lot of action but I've never heard about it outside of those folks that I used play (which I no longer play with).

    I've been thinking of introducing to some current players but thought I'd ask around and see if anyone has heard of it or played it.

    Its a flop/board/community card game similar to criss-cross with a line going up-down and another line going left-right and set of swing cards in the middle. See the diagrams below for the card counts:

    .....2
    .2..3..2
    .....2

    Everyone gets 4 cards dealt to them. We usually played forced betting but you could use blinds easily. There is a blind bet, you flip the top-left cards, bet, flip the bottom-right cards, bet and flip the swing (center) cards and bet.

    You can now use any of the 11 (yes 11 cards) to build your best high hand. You need to use at least 1 card from your hand and obviously 1 card from the board. Optionally, you could play it like Omaha and require 2 from your hand and 3 from the board. This would hide the hands more.

    As I mentioned its a split pot game with a standard high hand getting half and the highest Timbuk getting half. The Timbuk consists of the most parts to a straight flush. Here are some examples:

    Ah2h3h - 3 part Timbuk
    AhKh - 2 part Timbuk
    7d8d9d10d - 4 part Timbuk

    In the examples the above, the 4 part would be the best Timbuk, followed by the 3 part and then the 2 part. Obviously, a 5 part Timbuk (aka straight flush) will scoop the whole pot. Because of all the cards out, straight flushes are not that uncommon and what you play for. Occasionally, you would see multiple straight flushes or get the dreaded bottom end of the straight flush (7h8h9h on board, you have the 5h6h and someone else flips over 10hJh)
     
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