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Someone please explain to me how to leave more often when I am up.

Discussion in 'Poker Stories and Bad Beats' started by Nexttime, Jun 20, 2008.

  1. Nexttime

    Nexttime Well-Known Member

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    2/5NL. In for 200, got up to 610 in 2 hours, cashed out for 180. One part of me screams I should have left earlier, but stayed 4 more hours and lost my lead. Had a good time, no huge bad beats. Of course, I know I should have avoided a few hands, like losing with nut flush draws to short stacks who pushed 50 allin into a 120 pot, etc. Bad math, but I had the right reads, two cards to come for a flush against their top pair, etc. If things went well I could have built my stack up to 1k+, So am I worried about nothing? Is playing in a loose aggressive game worth the ups and downs? Same game last week, I bought in for $200 x 2 and cashed out $1400 when the game broke.

    Do I set a hard rule that if I get 2 to 3 times buying I should always cash out shortly?
    Should I be flexable, play the mood at the table and just suck up the variance?


    Does anything above make sense?
     
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  2. Deuce

    Deuce Creativity Alliance

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    I have 3 criteria that I establish before I play...

    I decide how long Im going to play for...
    I decide how much Im willing to lose...
    and I decide an amount I'm comfortable with being up and walking away.

    Whichever of those 3 come first is what dictates when I leave a session. Sometime plans change but I try and keep to those guidelines as much as possible.

    Example... For my Bachelor party I played some poker at Binon's. It was the $1-2 NL and I bought in with $100. I decided I would play no longer then 3 hours (friends were there with me), lose more then $200, or I would leave when I was up 3 buy-ins.

    I was up 3 buy-ins in like 10 hands because of some crazy hands and I got up to leave. A couple people weren't happy about it at the table but honestly I didn't care since that money basically paid for my weekend.
     
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  3. OnTheButton

    OnTheButton Well-Known Member

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    If I'm in a casino, playing virually any game, a 3x my "sit down" usually results in leaving the table. At least after it feels like "the rush" is over.

    At a home game, if I'm up 3x or more, I'll typically tighten way up, only play and chase premium hands, take lots of mini breaks, and stretch the time out until an opportunity to leave the table without guilt arrives. (aka someone else leaving is a good lead into saying "Ya know, I've gotta go too.")

    Hosting the games at our house makes it a little harder, since the wife and I are typically the next to the last people at the table.

    I learned long ago from a veteran gambler that: "Most people seem to know when they have lost as much as they can afford to. The casinos stay open because too many people don't recognize when they've won enough to leave as well."

    So set a goal, on both the positive and negative ends of your bank roll, and stick to it the best you can.
     
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  4. joepro

    joepro Well-Known Member
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    Most pros will say "stay in the game if it is a good game, and if you feel good." It's so hard to determine this, though. I too have a hard time getting up, mainly because I don't get to play that much any more, and I love to play so much. If I drag a few big pots early, you can be sure some of that is going back in a few hours, most of the time. I have had steady runs of over 10 hours of winning, and I guess that's another reason I can't leave when the gettin' is good.
     
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  5. jojobinks

    jojobinks Poker Nerd (and Admin)
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    the best way to leave more often when you're up is to rack up your chips and go to the cage. there really is no trick besides that.

    the important thing is to think about this AWAY from the table. at the table you have mixed emotions, including the adrenaline of your win. so...if booking a win is really important to you, if you're going to be really pissed about being up a bunch and then losing it back...then setting some sort of rule (leave when up $x) is a good one for you.

    if you're able to disassociate, then stay 'til the game is bad, or you're not feeling well anymore.
     
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  6. abby99

    abby99 Admin / Chip Magpie
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    Been there, done that. I've read what the pros say, but sometimes it's difficult to assess the EV of a table or one's own energy level and how one truly feels.

    If you think that perhaps you should leave, leave.

    If you're not sure how you feel, take a break. As Jojo mentioned, it's easier to evaluate your self away from the table.
     
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  7. k9dr

    k9dr Well-Known Member

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    I was racking up my 2 x buyin win one time, planning to leave after the button when I was dealt K6 in the BB. Four limpers to me so I got to see a free flop. I would have folded to any bet at that point. Flop comes Q66. Checks to me once again and I make a small bet - one caller. Don't remember the turn or river, but I ended up all in against villain's A6. Needless to say, I now leave when I am ready and do not see "just one more hand."

    In general, I leave when I am too tired to play effectively, I have tripled my buy in, or I have lost my budget for the day. Most people entering a casino lose because they say they will play until they lose X amount of dollars - a self fulfilling prophecy. It takes true discipline to quit when you win X amount of dollars, but it is much more profitable.
     
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  8. beekeeper

    beekeeper Creativity Alliance

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    When I go to a casino to play, I'm there to play. At some point during the night I usually double my buy-in (only a few times have I tripled it), but when I leave, the most I'm usually up is 60-75%. I can't seem to leave because I'm having so much fun. Even when I lose, I'm having fun (and I only bring an amount I'm comfortable losing).

    That said, at our home game, because our size has diminished, we've been playing strictly cash for a while. We play a $1-$5 spread limit hold'em game. The last 4 times we've played, I've been up about $80 each night, but gone home either even or slightly ahead/slightly down. When my stack is around its peak, I think to myself, "I should go." But, again, I'm having fun hanging out with my friends and I want to stay. I should at least tighten up, but having all that $ makes me feel like I'm free rolling, so instead I take more chances and play stupid suited gappers, etc....

    So...when you figure it out, let me know I guess. :sorry:
     
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  9. mac40k

    mac40k Well-Known Member

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    I've been in situations where I've been up early and decided to keep playing because the game was good, resulting in even more money in my stack when I finally did cash out. I've also been in those situations where I was up early and kept playing only to take a bad beat or two later and end up staying several hours longer trying to "get it back" only to go home broke. My biggest problem seems to be recognizing that point when the game (or my play) has gone bad and staying only means losing more.

    Of course when I host, I'm usually in until the end regardless, because I can't cash out and just sit and watch others play and I can't end the game just because I'm up and want to keep it that way. Fortunately, I haven't been in the situation where I've gone broke and had to sit out in my own home or risk funds I wasn't planning to to be able to keep playing. But I have also probably "given some back" more times than not by not quitting until everyone else got tired.
     
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  10. abby99

    abby99 Admin / Chip Magpie
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    Take your spouse or significant other with you. :wink:
     
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  11. xtwalker

    xtwalker Well-Known Member

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    FYP...

    For me, it depends on your motivation for playing... My bank roll would be exponentially higher if I always left "at the top" whenever I hit my peak stack size for the evening.

    For me, playing isn't about the money. It is about enjoyment of the game. I have a additional factor involved though, I travel an hr+ each way to play. I don't want to travel 2-3 hrs total to play for less than 3-4 hrs. I generally try to allow for 6-8 hrs when I go.
     
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  12. luckychick

    luckychick Creativity Alliance

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    This is often why I end up going home. I think I have a flatter butt than him, or something.

    Anyway, it seems there are two issues at hand (1) high variance LAG play, and (2) when to quit.

    LAG play has a lot of big swings. I think it's hard to know if you're really a good player when you are a LAG, because it takes a lot of hands (= alot of hours live) to know if you're ahead or not. Anectodely, I think a lot of LAGs make more money at teh beginning of a session because people will giv them the benefit of the doubt and lay down a lot, but then towards the end of a session more people stand up (or, wait for huge hands) to break him. A good LAG has to adjust to this.

    If you like to play LAG (yeah, it's fun) that's fine, just make sure you have the personality to absorb the swings, because they're going to happen regardless of when you cash out.

    (2) When to cash out. I think this depends a bit on your motives to play poker. The "playing dead tired at a good table" thing is fine - if you're a pro. I'm not. I play for fun. So I play as long as I'm having fun. When I'm tired, or the table is crabby, I go home.

    Everyone has a peak stack at some point. It's seldom when you cash out. As long as you are not cashing out at your bottom point (i.e. $0) everytime, it doesn't really matter.
     
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