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Packing and Shipping Chips - A guide for beginning buyers and sellers

Discussion in 'Poker Chip Advice' started by TX_kiwi, Aug 20, 2008.

  1. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Packing and Shipping Chips - A guide for beginning buyers and sellers

    by TX_Kiwi

    This article is aimed at people who are new to shipping chips. It is a distillation of advice that I have received from others and my own experiences after over a year on Chiptalk. I have focused on the use of United States Postal Service (USPS) 'flate rate' envelopes and boxes, since this is the most cost effective service in the US. Link It is also surprisingly swift.:)

    I have also offered a couple of hints if you are using Paypal for the transaction.


    Paypal

    Send the buyer an invoice via paypal. This allows you to itemize the shipping and additional charges (e.g. insurance). Under the tab “Request Money”, look for the line “Create Invoice" and click that link.
    <O:razz:


    Printing Shipping Label

    If you print out the USPS shipping label directly from the paypal transaction, then you automatically get the buyer’s and your addresses populated on the label. You also get free delivery confirmation (worth 65c) by clicking through from Paypal. Delivery confirmation is good protection for both parties, because the buyer has proof that the chips were shipped and the seller has proof that the package was indeed delivered.

    You can also add insurance in the same transaction via Paypal. The cost of the shipping itself is $10.35 (or $13.95 for the larger size) for a flat rate box with discounts for online purchase. All the USPS charges (shipping and insurance) can be debited directly from your Paypal balance (or paid by a further Paypal transaction).

    Printing the label is also possible directly from the USPS site and this also provides free delivery confirmation on all Priority Mail labels. Using the USPS site you get a 5% online discount for the cost of the postage in many cases, a discount off the price of upgrading to 'Signature Confirmation', and you don't need Paypal.

    E-mailing or PMing the USPS confirmation number to the buyer is a nice touch so that they know that you have sent the package and they can track progress.


    Packing over 100 Chips

    Roll the chips in rolls of 50 in letter size printer paper (if you use printed paper, use the blank side against the chips to prevent ink transfer). Or you can use bubble wrap to tightly wrap each roll.

    It’s easier and faster to use an empty row of a chip case as a guide when forming these rolls. Lay the paper in the empty row, place the 50 chips and then roll it up using the row as a former. Try and get each roll as tight as possible (the objective is to prevent any movement between chips within the wrapped bundle) and tape up each roll. Rolls of approx 50 are small enough to roll tighly and to keep the roll compact and robust. Longer rolls (say 100 chips) tend to split open easier.

    Once all the rolls are wrapped, then tape the rolls tightly together (e.g. for 500, perhaps a row of 3 bundles, then a row of four with a final row of three bundles on top). Tape the whole bundle in multiple directions to make a strong and tight package. The advantage of this method of packing is that even if the outer box is damaged, it is less likely that the chips will fall out, since they are taped into one large mass inside the outer packaging.

    [​IMG]
    A bundle of 500 chips (10 rows of 50 each)
    Click to enlarge

    Flat rate boxes and envelopes are free from the USPS. You can pick them up from any post office or they will send them to you free of charge via their web-site: Link

    Use a 11" X 8.5" X 5.5" (or the 12” x 12” x 5-1/2”) flat rate box. Don’t use the 11-7/8" x 3-3/8" x 13-5/8" flat rate box, because they are longer and thinner and tend to deform in shipping under the weight of the chips (I had one lot arrive in one of these boxes and the box had split open - I was lucky that they all made it!).

    The general rule of thumb is no more than 800 chips per 11" X 8.5" X 5.5" box. Any more than that means that you don't have enough room for padding. Furthermore, although well within the USPS weight limit, 800 chips is getting heavy enough to potentially attract shipping damage.

    [​IMG]
    The bundle of 500 chips in a 11" x 8½" x 5½" box (plenty of room for packing fillers)
    Click to enlarge

    Use plenty of packing (bubble wrap, packing peanuts or crushed newspaper) around the bundle of chips to take up all the airspace inside the box. The goal is to provide padding and, again, prevent movement. Try to prevent any chips being in direct contact with the internal surfaces of the box. You should use enough packing that the box should bulge ever so slightly when you tape it closed.

    [​IMG]
    Click to enlarge

    Tape all the seams of the box with packing tape so that they are less likely to open up in transit.

    [​IMG]
    Tape on all seams, including the pre-glued seam down the side of the box.
    Click to enlarge


    Here's a few pointers about USPS boxes and taping the seams:
    • All flat rate boxes are 'Priority' and you are entitled to use the 'priority mail' tape available at the post office (saves your packing tape!). You can ask to use the tape to seal the box seams and wrap it about 4-5 times around the box or your friendly post office worker may even do it for you if you ask nicely.
    • Exercise caution with USPS self adhesive boxes. These are apparently priority boxes that look a lot like their flat rate brethren, but aren't flat rate. Apparently, you will need to get the post office to tape up the seams on this type of box - i.e. can't do it yourself. (myself, I prefer to use the flat rate box).
    USPS will even uplift the package for free: http://www.usps.com/pickup/welcome.htm


    Packing Under 100 Chips

    Envelopes (cardboard or bubble wrap mailers) are ideal for small consignments of chips - e.g. up to 5 - 8 chips. Just make sure that each chip is lying flat in the envelope, is adequately protected and they can't rub against each other.

    However, be wary of the temptation to use these envelopes for larger numbers of chips to save on shipping costs. If you must insist on using an envelope for a moderate quantity of chips (i.e.15 - 50 chips), then don’t roll the chips into bundles. The envelope needs to be as flat as possible to go through mail sorting machines. I have successfully received approx 50 chips in a 11” x 8½” envelope where the seller taped the chips in a flat layer between a sheet of cardboard (that was cut to the right size to slide into the envelope) and a layer of bubble wrap over the top. However, those chips were at liberty to move around and rub against each other inside this inner envelope and they were only okay because they were the nearly indestructable Faux Clays.

    Another Chiptalker reports success using this method of shipping in envelopes:

    [​IMG]

    Notice the cost on the envelope for shipping those from USA to Germany (US $11.95), which is the main reason to use this method (lower costs).

    However, I personally would think long and hard before sending any significant quantity of chips in a cardboard or bubblewrap envelope:
    A. The edges and thin seams of an envelope can more easily open up during shipping and you run the risk of an empty envelope with a hole in the edge arriving at the destination. Remember, the items inside aren't papers, but relatively rigid and heavy items that can force open the edges with their own mass and shape due to their movement inside the envelope during all the handling.

    B. You cannot put adequate packing around the chips to buffer them. The chips are close to the extremities of the envelope and are more susceptible to damage.

    C. The envelope contents usually can't be insured.

    D. Depending on the degree of bulge, some post offices may refuse to accept the envelope.
    There is a new USPS small 'Flate Rate' box, available from January 2009. The 'Priority Mail Small Flat Rate Box' measures 8-5/8 x 5-3/8 x 1-5/8 inches (about the same size and shape as three stacked DVD cases).

    This smaller sized box appears to be a good option for moderate sized consignments of chips ( e.g. 15 - 100 chips) and is a much better option than a flat rate envelope IMO. However, this small box does have some limitations. The first limitation is that this box appears to lack sufficient depth for chips in rolls (the depth of 1 and 5/8" equals 41.3mm and most chips are 39mm or 40mm diameter) so some other form of packing them tightly would be needed (perhaps 'flattened rolls' like in the picture above, that are taped to a single piece of cardboard and then layered in with packing protection all around). The second limitation is that the cardborad is thinner than that used other flat rate boxes, so it will be more susceptable to splitting open. This box can be posted at a flate rate of $4.95 regardless of weight ( Link ).

    [​IMG]
    The smaller box (notice that there is no space to pad chips)
    Click to enlarge

    Shipping to Canada

    Ask for First Class Mail International and have the Post Office weigh the box. Unless the box is very heavy it will be much cheaper to go First Class by weight than by sending it via International Priority Mail Flat Rate. Also Priority mail is more likely to attract the attention of customs. International First Class Mail will still get a tracking number.


    The Golden Rules


    :!: Prevent movement of the chips,

    :!: Ensure that the chips are a single bundle inside the outer shipping container (less chance that they will slip out if the outer container is damaged)

    :!: A box gives more protection than an envelope (the few dollars more is worth peace of mind),

    :!: Reinforce the envelope or box as much as possible (tape reinforcement), and

    :!: Space = problems.



    Horror Stories

    :razz: Chips wrapped in aluminium foil,

    :roll: Chips rattling loose inside plastic containers,

    :dead: Chips loose in boxes (with or without a token gesture amount of packing peanuts)


    Conclusion

    This is what you are guarding against:
    Special Delivery
    Way to Go Brown!
    At The Airport

    No matter how well you pack chips, postal mishaps can, and do, occur. However, the suggestions in this article may help your consignment to get through, even if the package suffers damage in transit.

    There are, of course, many options and others will have different preferences. However, these techniques have worked for me; both as a buyer and a seller. I hope that the information is useful to people who are new to Chiptalk transactions. Indeed, buyers might want to request that sellers follow these guidelines. :wink:

    May all your shipments get through unscathed ...

    Thanks to Jamby, Guinness, UW85, Cidertown, Blaster, Snake, Midnight Rose and Cdnmoose for their valued input to this article.
     
    #1
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2009
  2. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Mods - any interest in posting this mini-article where it is easier to find (i.e taking it out of the drafting wiki forum)?
     
    #2
  3. Cidertown

    Cidertown Faux Clay Nation

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    I like it very much. Might we add a DO NOT section, where we catalog terrible packing ideas that the inexperienced might otherwise use? I'm thinking of foil wrapping, packing chips in racks, putting chips in unpadded envelopes, etc.
     
    #3
  4. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Good idea. You and any others, feel free to post horror stories (the more detail the better) and I'll condense it into a 'don't do it' section.
     
    #4
  5. jamby

    jamby Creativity Alliance

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    Awesome idea for article content. Here's my horror story and resulting tip. I purchased more than 2,000 mint Paulsons that were shipped to me in those large rectangular flat rate boxes. The kind with adhesive that tell you not to add your own tape or alter in anyway. Well, one of the several sent arrived sans contents. One side of it was wide open and there was nothing at all inside. Turns out the seller had only insured it for a minimal $100 so much was lost as some $600+ of chips were enclosed. It was a very sad day for the seller and myself.

    Here's the tip - actually a two-fold one.

    1) Don't use the rectangular boxes if you can help it. Instead use those that are more square shaped and have no self-adhesive. You're allowed to tape those.

    2) If you do use the rectangular ones with adhesive, ask the post office personnel to tape it for you with their priority mail tape when you drop it off. I've not met one yet who refused to tape up the ends for me.

    Cheers and again, nice job on the article.
     
    #5
  6. MarkC79

    MarkC79 Well-Known Member

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    Great article! I always like using the slightly larger sized rectangular self adhesive boxes for shipping up to 200 chips. I'm not sure if they make this box anymore but it is slightly larger than the smallest size. It fits 2 - 100 chip boxes (asm/bcc) with a little room for padding/insulation. it works well for me! The only issue is at 200 chips the weight will slightly bump it over the cost of using a flat rate box. So anything over like 150, I'd probably opt for the flat rate box.
     
    #6
  7. jamby

    jamby Creativity Alliance

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    There are now three different sized flat rate boxes since they recently added an extra large 'squarish' sized box that doesn't come with the self-adhesive at a higher cost.

    Dimensions of the three versions from usps.com are:

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" summary="This table is used to format list content." border=0><TBODY><TR><TD vAlign=top align=middle width=10>[​IMG][​IMG]</TD><TD class=mainText vAlign=top width="98%">11" x 8.5" x 5.5" </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top align=middle width=10>[​IMG][​IMG]</TD><TD class=mainText vAlign=top width="98%">13.625" x 11.875" x 3.375" </TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top align=middle width=10>[​IMG][​IMG]</TD><TD class=mainText vAlign=top width="98%">12" x 12" x 5.5" - the new addition

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
     
    #7
  8. guinness

    guinness Degen Gatekeeper
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    All flat rate boxes are priority and you are entitled to using the priority mail tape at your disposal at the post office. I always grab the tape and loopdee-loop about 4-5 times on the box.
     
    #8
  9. jamby

    jamby Creativity Alliance

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    True when speaking specifically of the current box offerings, but there are also flat rate express mail envelopes. I think the biggest confusion is that there are priority boxes that look a lot like their flat rate brethren, but aren't flat rate.
     
    #9
  10. MarkC79

    MarkC79 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah that's what I was talking about with the smaller priority boxes that aren't flat rate. If you load em up with 200 chips that fit nicely, the cost is actually higher than using a flat rate box.
     
    #10
  11. TenPercenter

    TenPercenter Administrator
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    TX_kiwi, you need some serious reformatting on this one. It looks like the classic copy/paste problem when going from Word to CT.

    The concept is a great idea, a perfect topic for members here. Let's get it fixed up and publish it! :)
     
    #11
  12. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Ten,

    I have cleaned up the formatting and updated the article to include input from Jamby, Cidertown and Guinness.

    I think that it is good to go 'final'.
     
    #12
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2008
  13. UW85

    UW85 Chipaholic
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    wow, this article is way overdue -- countless threads about this stuff. Nice job! Just another idea you can use or not, but I've always wrapped my 20 -50 rolls with bubble wrap, super tight, and then used box or strapping tape around it. NASA actually stole my idea for landing the Mars rover missions -- I guess they were thinking if the USPS hasn't destroyed any of my packaging over the years that's a tougher environment to "land" a package in than some planet off in space.
    :)
    Thanks again for doing this article. Oh one other version of a golden rule: Space = Problems. In other words, if your package has any open spaces then you can get movement, and all the potential issues that come with it as you've mentioned.
     
    #13
  14. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Pointers incorporated. Thanks.:)
     
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  15. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Ten,

    I think that it is now truely 'final'.
     
    #15
  16. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Bump - good to go?
     
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  17. Blaster

    Blaster Well-Known Member

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    There's a new "small Flate Rate" box, in effect from 1-18-09, & now avail on the USPS website, for a flate rate of $4.95 regardless of weight. (The box, of course, is free.)
    The dimensions are 5-3/8” x 8-5/8” x 1-5/8” & delivery confirmation is free if you print the label off the USPS site.
     
    #17
  18. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks - article updated.
     
    #18
  19. TheSnake

    TheSnake Final Table
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    Sending 100 chips in an envelope, a pic says more than many words...

    [​IMG]

    That´s the way most of the chips in envelopes arrived at my home. :wink:
     
    #19
  20. TX_kiwi

    TX_kiwi Well-Known Member

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    So how do you rate that method:
    • Good practice
    • Okay, but with reservations - it could go wrong
    • Hate it
    Have you encountered any damage?
     
    #20

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